Monthly Archives: January 2013

Veterinary Medicine Once Again Profession with Highest Suicide Rate in UK

High-risk occupations for suicide.
Psychol Med. October 2012;0(0):1-10.
S E Roberts1; B Jaremin; K Lloyd
1College of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea, UK.

Article Abstract

BACKGROUND: High occupational suicide rates are often linked to easy occupational access to a method of suicide. This study aimed to compare suicide rates across all occupations in Britain, how they have changed over the past 30 years, and how they may vary by occupational socio-economic group.

METHODS: We used national occupational mortality statistics, census-based occupational populations and death inquiry files (for the years 1979-1980, 1982-1983 and 2001-2005). The main outcome measures were suicide rates per 100 000 population, percentage changes over time in suicide rates, standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and proportional mortality ratios (PMRs).

RESULTS: Several occupations with the highest suicide rates (per 100 000 population) during 1979-1980 and 1982-1983, including veterinarians (ranked first), pharmacists (fourth), dentists (sixth), doctors (tenth) and farmers (thirteenth), have easy occupational access to a method of suicide (pharmaceuticals or guns). By 2001-2005, there had been large significant reductions in suicide rates for each of these occupations, so that none ranked in the top 30 occupations. Occupations with significant increases over time in suicide rates were all manual occupations whereas occupations with suicide rates that decreased were mainly professional or non-manual. Variation in suicide rates that was explained by socio-economic group almost doubled over time from 11.4% in 1979-1980 and 1982-1983 to 20.7% in 2001-2005.

CONCLUSIONS: Socio-economic forces now seem to be a major determinant of high occupational suicide rates in Britain. As the increases in suicide rates among manual occupations occurred during a period of economic prosperity, carefully targeted suicide prevention initiatives could be beneficial.

We Haven’t Seen Her in a While, so…

Here’s Brigitte, our favorite Assassin bug attractant.

brigitte-bardot

Happy New Year. Don’t forget to dance, get your Vitamin D, or read about Chagas’ Disease.

2012 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

4,329 films were submitted to the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. This blog had 32,000 views in 2012. If each view were a film, this blog would power 7 Film Festivals

Click here to see the complete report.

Happy New Year! Barely anyone died of Avian Influenza last year,

Making it a good yeargoodyear

 

 

Date: Fri 28 Dec 2012

Source: The Poultry Site [edited]

<http://www.thepoultrysite.com/poultrynews/27667/who-reports-32-cases-of-h5n1-in-humans-this-year>

 

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), there have been 32

cases of avian A(H5N1) influenza virus infection in humans so far this

year [2012], 20 of whom have died.

According to the latest figures, published by WHO on 17 Dec 2012, most

of the victims were in Egypt (11 cases; 5 deaths) but there were also

9 cases in Indonesia, 4 in Viet Nam, 3 in Bangladesh and Cambodia, and

2 in China.

 

Last year, 2011, there were 62 cases, of whom 34 died.

 

Since the emergence of H5N1 influenza in 2003, 610 people are reported

to have become infected, 360 of whom have died.

 

Still virulent after all these years

Still virulent after all these years