Category Archives: Public Health History

Mental Health Monday, either early or late

From Nursing Mental Diseases, by Harriet Bailey, RN

MS. BAILEY WROTE IN 1929:

In the prevention of mental deficiency segregation is recognized as a most important measure, for these individuals have not the mental qualities which make them valuable to society, and economically they are a partial or a total loss. Furthermore, it is an established fact that this type of defective family increases at about double the rate of the general population, that feeblemindedness is inherited, for parents cannot transmit to their children nervous and mental strength which is not theirs to give. From some recent studies made of the feebleminded, it has been shown that not all mental defectives are a social menace, and therefore in need of segregation. Thees studies have also shown that when properly educated and specially trained in the manual and industrial arts, many of them become quiet, law-abiding, useful citizens. Experience also shows that only through education and supervision may they be saved from lived of inefficiency, failure, dependency, and misery.

feebleminded table

 

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His love for us was so great,

that even from Beyond the Grave, this wonderful, kind, and always smiling Man is still trying to save you from liberals . No wonder we love him so much.

St. Ronald speaks out against Medicare

Things to be thankful for this holiday season

American life expectancy is shorter than countries like Finland, Sweden and Denmark. One of the legacies of American Conservatism is the gift of having to put up with fewer years of the creeping socialized medicine ruining this country, thereby reducing  just yet another indignity of old age.

We love you, Ronny!

From Manson’s Tropical Diseases, 13th edition

Save the Colonial Subjects! (But leave the Women and Fat Guys at Home.)

For years, Manson’s was the textbook on tropical disease. The 13th edition had some notions that we would now call, at best, quaint. It was, after all, 1951.

Chapter 1

Preparations for Residence in the Tropics

General Observations

In examining personnel with reference to their fitness for residence in the tropics, the age of the candidate is obviously important. He or she should have attained maximum development before going out. Those under 21—and this is especially true of women—withstand extreme heat and humidity badly, and appear, moreover to be more susceptible to tropical diseases. Women should be fully matured in mind as well as body and, as a rule, their age to be somewhat higher than that for men, which is from 23 to 25. It is a matter of observation that men over 40 find it difficult to accustom themselves to a intense heat, though exceptions will readily occur to the mind, such as Robert Koch, a pioneer in medical find, and Abel Chapman in zoology. Both had already passed 40 ere they set foot in central Africa, and both found themselves equal to its exacting demands.

While there can be no absolute standard of height and weight, the deviation from the generally accepted averages should not be great. As a rule, spareness  is more desirable than plumpness. Certainly the tropics is no place for the fat man. The “lanky,” spare type is best suited to tropical conditions, and the dark-hair, brown-eyed and dark- complexioned is generally considered more fitted than the blue-eyed, fair-haired, tender skin “Nordic” or “Aryan” type.