Category Archives: Vector-borne disease

Check out this post at pazonehealth.org

Because nothing helps to influence people more than intimate knowledge of parasitic diseases. Fact. hydatid being removed from brain.http://www.pazonehealth.org/single-post/2017/09/27/Hydatid-Disease-Part-IV

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Mummies, Chagas’ Disease, Drinks, and Dishes

YOU HAVE TO WONDER about the minds of Incas and scientists.

The mummified remains of a  young woman from Peru have been analyzed. According to radioactive carbon dating, the woman died around 600 years ago. They know that she was Incan by the way that her skull was modified. (I can talk about pretty much any sort of disease or bodily fluid, even while eating, but this enforced body distortion absolutely creeps me out. Not fond of looking at the faces of mummies, either, for that matter.)

Why was this particular woman sacrificed? The researchers, guessing from DNA found in her, believe that she had Chagas’ disease and that her poor health probably made her a likely candidate. We therefore have another reason not to get Chagas’ disease: you will be more likely to be the one chosen to get tossed into the volcano or offered up à la Fay Wray, albeit to smaller primates and ones with prehensile tails.

THE CHILCANO

We haven’t put a drink recipe on here in a while, and if you are relying on us  that you are feeling either pretty thirsty or are sick to death of algorobina cocktails and pisco sours.

The Chilcano was invented in honor of Robinson Canó’s attempt to bring béisbol to Chile, a typically fútbol-mad country. MLB, in the face of waning enthusiasm for baseball, was hoping that the Caribbean locura for the beauty of the diamond would spread to the rest of Latin America, and lead a resurgence in what they hope will be not just America’s pastime, but the  Americas’ pastime. Canó, as MVP,  was sent as an ambassador. Peru, of course, was in principle opposed to this gesture, not because of any dislike for baseball, but what they saw as yet another attempt by their southern neighbors to appropriate pisco as their own, when everyone (including the EU)  knows that Pisco es Peruano.

I like the chilcano because it is easy and it is refreshing.

Into a tall glass filled with ice:

  • 1-2 oz. Pisco
  • 4 oz. ginger ale, ginger beer, or other fizzy mixer.
  • Squeeze the juice of 1/4 lime
  • Garnish with a slice of lime.

chilcano-8277-750x500

AND NOW, for the dish:8full-sylva-koscina
Sylva Koscina was an Italian movie actress, born in the Kingdom of Yugoslavia (now Croatia). She had a successful career in the ’50s and ’60s, and men of a certain age might remember her playing opposite Paul Newman in the The Secret War of Harry Frigg. She invested all of her wealth in a luxurious villa in Rome, but as her income dwindled, she was forced to sell it in order to avoid a charge of tax evasion.

Ms. Koscina died in 1994, at the age of 61, due to breast cancer.

Sylva_Koscina

Chagas’ Disease is NOT the new AIDS: Part I

IN SPITE OF WHAT YOU MAY HAVE READ IN MY FAVORITE NEWSPAPER (the NY Times):

It is a great picture of the bug, though. Why do biting arthropods always have their portraits taken while posing on human flesh?

Chagas’ Disease, while being a medical nightmare, is not the new AIDS.

  • The first, and perhaps biggest problem with this article is calling Chagas’ Disease the “new” anything. Chagas’ disease was discovered in 1909 by a brilliant Brazilian scientist, Carlos Chagas. Chagas’ discovery was justly recognized for this great discovery during his own lifetime.
  • Chagas’ disease is like AIDS, in that it targets certain populations, but that is where the similarity stops. Chagas’ disease is spread by a vector (bugs of the family Reduviidae) that is exquisitely evolved to infect the poor, as it is related to low-quality housing. AIDS does target the poor of the world more than the rich, but there are certain groups that AIDS targeted, or continues to target, that have nothing to do with economic standing. AIDS is not transmitted by arthropod vectors (though there was concern in the early years of the pandemic), but by sexual contact and contaminated transfusions and medical equipment. Chagas’ disease can be spread by transfusion, but this risk is decreasing. As of a few years ago,around two decades after the blood supply began being screened for HIV,  the blood supply in the US began being screened for Chagas’ disease.
  • Chagas’ disease is called a Neglected Tropical Disease. These are diseases that have high prevalence in the hotter regions of the globe, affect a large number of people but yet do not get a lot of attention from the press, their governments, NGOs, and even much of the local population. For example, many residents of Lima (where the power is) don’t even know what Chagas’ disease is, even though it afflicts a large number of Peruvians. Why?  It doesn’t occur in Lima, and public education about the disease does not extend to those who won’t get it, even though they may be the ones most able to help.
  • Stigma: Yes, it sucks to get AIDS or Chagas’ or both together. But tell me from your heart of hearts: Which would you rather tell your co-workers and parents–that you’ve contracted HIV or that you’ve contracted Chagas’. I’m betting on Chagas’. 30 years into the epidemic, and HIV/AIDS still carries a burden unmatched by any other disease.
  • Research funding: No comparison. HIV/AIDS has been a research juggernaut over much of the pandemic. As a result, we’ve made brilliant and amazing progress in treatment and prevention of the disease. Chagas’ disease is still treated by the same two lousy drugs that were used over a decade ago. Some research is being done on new treatments, but I you’d be embarrassed to see the shoestring some of those labs run on. Moreover, most of these studies involve using drugs that were already approved for other indications, such as anti-fungals and anti-malarials.(They ain’t much money to make sellin’ drugs to po’ folk in the developin’ world.)

    No mention of Chagas' disease here.

    No mention of Chagas’ disease here.

That last one was our 100th Post!

LET US GIVE THANKS TO ST. BRIGITTE, OUR PATRON SAINT

Even though this is a public health site, it seems that more people have been led here by the formerly freakishly thin-waisted,

Head, thorax, abdomen..

animal-loving,

buck-toothed,

In her defense, she did say: "Apart from my husband—who maybe will cross over one day as well—I am entirely surrounded by homos. For years, they have been my support, my friends, my adopted children, my confidants."

and proud  hate-speech spewer (several times arrested and fined)

WE KNOW that it would be mean-spirited and even provincially gringoish to disparage a great cultural icon and source of pride to the Gallic heart. We just want to give our readers more of what they want, with the ulterior motive of promoting public health.

With that in mind, we provide this link to an article on the movement to address Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Assassin Bugs on the Beach

And now, …

Put some DEET on those shoulders, Brigitte, or The Invasive Little Mosquito

This is Aedes albopictus.
This is a female Aedes albopictus  sucking blood from a human being. (Only the females suck blood.)

Who signs up as the hand models for these pictures, anyway?

This is another picture of one sucking blood. It turns out that in most pictures of mosquitoes that they are posing on a human’s hand.

This is where Aedes albopictus should be found.

Geographical range
Native range: Ae. albopictus occurs thoughout the Oriental Region from the tropics of Southeast Asia, the Pacific and Indian Ocean Islands, north through China and Japan and west to Madagascar.


These are some of the places where Aedes albopictus has been introduced.

Where Ae. albopictus was found in the US, 10 years ago. How much has it spread since then?

This is another..

Watch out, Daisy Miller!

…and here are some more spots.

This is where mosquitoes like to live, breed, and hitch intercontinental rides.

(Used tires are shipped from one country to another.)

Aedes albopictus is a vector of some really nasty diseases, like Dengue and Chikungunya (post coming soon).

I believe that both Brigitte and Issur Danielovitch were wearing sun block and insect repellent, as they are still alive to tell the tale.

Known introduced range: Ae. albopictus has been one of the fastest spreading animal species over the past two decades (Benedict et al. 2007). The mosquito has been introduced in North and South America, with more recent introductions having occurred in Africa, Australia and Europe, where it is established in Albania and Italy and where it has been detected in France (Eritja et al. 2005). In the United States, it is established in most states east of the Mississippi River as far as Minnesota and Delaware (Source: Novak). It has spread to at least 28 countries outside its native range around the globe (Benedict et al. 2008). Climate change will likely allow tiger mosquitoes to further increase their range by increasing areas of suitable climate. These areas could include Australia (Dr. Moira McKinnon pers. comm. in Beilharz 2009), New Zealand (Derraik, 2004) and further north in the United States (Phillips, 2008).

Check out this invasive species link, which is where the above quote came from.

Tonight we revel

 

One of the reasons we watched Monty Python: Carol Cleveland

 

BECAUSE THE BUGS ARE COMING BACK TOMORROW

You'll see me tomorrow (Asian Tiger Mosquito)